2016 Affordable Care Act (ACA) Reporting in Sage 100

I’m sure we all remember the agonizing exercise last year at this time that we called ACA Reporting in Sage 100. Unfortunately, it’s time to do it again. Affordable Care Act reporting is once again required for the year ending 12/31/2016. Any employers with 50 or more full-time employees or FTE’s must file the appropriate 1094-1095 forms with the IRS once again this year. Use the illustration below to determine which form(s) your company should file.

Which Form Do You Need?

Which Form Do You Need?

At Sage Summit 2016, the question was asked whether Sage would provide a method to carry over all ACA employee and employer information from 2015 into 2016 to make reporting just a little bit less labor intensive. While Sage representatives did promise to look into a utility, it did not happen. There is a ray of sunshine here, though: it is possible to export ACA information from 2015 and import back into the ACA tables to create 2016 records. We at Ennis, Pellum & Associates have written the export/import jobs and are available to assist you with setting up ACA reporting for 2016.

Some important news and notes regarding the Affordable Care Act:

  • March 2, 2017, is the deadline for furnishing 2016 Forms 1095-B and 1095-C to individuals. Despite the delay, however, employers and other coverage providers are encouraged to furnish 2016 statements to individuals as soon as they are able to.
  • February 28, 2017 is the deadline for 2016 filing with the IRS in paper form.
  • March 31, 2017 is the deadline for 2016 filing with the IRS electronically. Remember, if using Sage 100, Aatrix will file your forms electronically – for a fee.

For those of you who need more information about the Affordable Care Act, the following resources are available:

Again, if you need assistance with ACA reporting in your Sage 100 software, or if you would like help creating your 2016 files using 2015 data as a base, please contact Ed or Chris at Ennis, Pellum & Associates: 904-396-5965.

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Sage 100 – 2016 End-of-year updates available now

As of December 19, Sage has released the 2016 end-of-year Interim Release Download (IRD) and 2017 Q1 payroll tax table updates (TTU). The Aatrix year-end update is also available; when you first access either Payroll Federal E-Filing and Reporting or Accounts Payable Form 1099 eFiling and Reporting, you will be prompted to update your forms.

The following are the required minimum Sage 100 versions. If you are not at least on one of the minimum versions below, you must add the required product update (PU) or upgrade to get to the minimum before installing the 2016 IRD.
• 2016 Update 1 (5.30.1) and above
• 2015 Update 3 (5.20.3) and above
• 2014 Update 7 (5.10.7)
(Note: The 2016 IRD is included in the Sage 100 2017 release.)

In order to print or electronically file W-2, ACA or 1099 forms, you will need to use the following menu tasks:

  • Payroll tax forms: Payroll > Period End > Federal eFiling and Reporting
  • 1099 forms: Accounts Payable > Reports > Form 1099 eFiling and Reporting

The 2016 IRD contains the following enhancements for Accounts Payable:
IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION: 1099 Form changes were required for the tax year 2016 and have been incorporated in this update. Maintenance, data entry, as well as certain reports and Form 1099 eFiling and Reporting have been modified to adhere to the 2016 1099 Miscellaneous, Dividend, and Interest forms as published by the IRS for the tax year 2016 filings.

  • Once the 2016 IRD is installed, the new 2016 boxes will be available for all companies in the installation.
  • The following changes have been made to accommodate the correct placement of the following information:
    • 1099-INT:  Box 12 is now Bond premium on Treasury obligations
    • 1099-MISC:  No form changes
    • 1099-DIV: No form changes
  • Form 1099 eFiling and Reporting version has been updated to 2.62.

The 2016 IRD contains the following enhancements for Payroll:

  • There were no W-2 form changes for 2016
  • Federal and State eFiling and Reporting version has been updated to 2.62
  • New local tax jurisdictions for Ohio have been added in Tax Table Maintenance locality description listing
  • New ACA Offer of Coverage Codes have been added in ACA Employee Maintenance . Monthly Detail window
    • Code 1I :  Description: Reserved
    • Code 1J:  Description: Minimum essential coverage providing minimum value offered to you; minimum essential coverage conditionally offered to your spouse; and minimal essential coverage NOT offered to your dependent(s).
    • Code 1K: Description: Minimum essential coverage providing minimum value offered to you; minimum essential coverage conditionally offered to your spouse; and minimum essential coverage offered to your dependent(s).

The Technology Services Team at Ennis, Pellum & Associates stands ready to assist you with your 2016 year-end processing. You can contact either Chris (cmulhern@jaxcpa.com) or Ed (ewlodarczyk@jaxcpa.com) by e-mail or at (904) 396-5965.

 

 

 

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Sage 100 Payroll Year-end alert: New U.S. W-2/W-3 filing deadline is January 31, 2016

A new federal law, aimed at making it easier for the IRS to detect and prevent refund fraud, will accelerate the W-2 filing deadline for employers to Jan. 31.

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act, enacted in December 2015, includes a new requirement for employers. Employers are now required to file their copies of Form W-2, submitted to the Social Security Administration, by Jan. 31. The new Jan. 31 filing deadline also applies to certain Forms 1099-MISC reporting non-employee compensation such as payments to independent contractors. In the past, employers typically had until the end of February, if filing on paper, or the end of March, if filing electronically, to submit their copies of these forms.

In addition, there are changes in requesting an extension to file the Form W-2. Only one 30-day extension to file Form W-2 is available and this extension is not automatic. If an extension is necessary, a Form 8809 Application for Extension of Time to File Information Returns must be completed as soon as you know an extension is necessary, but by January 31.

As a result of this change, Sage and Aatrix strongly encourage you to send W-2 forms to their employees as early in January as possible.  This will allow time to identify and submit W-2 changes to avoid processing fees for corrections.

If you are using Sage 100 eFile and Reporting (Aatrix) to electronically process W-2’s, please be aware that in order to guarantee processing by the official due date, Aatrix is recommending that you complete processing earlier than the official government-established due dates to ensure all required processing occurs on a timely basis.

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Need to order Tax Forms for Sage 100? Read This First!

As we all now know, the only way to print our payroll and accounts payable year-end tax forms in Sage 100 is through the Aatrix eFile and Reporting tool. Sage 100 includes “print and sign” tax forms functionality for all payroll tax forms and A/P 1099 forms. However, IRS regulations require that employee copies of Form W-2 (copies B, C, and 2) and Form 1099 (except Copy A) be printed on perforated paper and individual filing instructions be given to each employee.

So, how do you know which form to purchase? Here is a helpful list, which also includes the product number should you prefer to order your forms directly from Sage:

  • W2/W3
    • Employee W2 (Copy B, C, and 2-Copy 2s): You need to order blank 4-part perforated forms with the Employee Notice printed on the back. If ordering from Sage, this is Sage Forms part # LW2BLANK4 (http://tinyurl.com/zybtoqq) or LW2BK4DWS (bundle with envelopes) (http://tinyurl.com/jektf24).
    • Federal W2 (Copy A): Print to Plain Paper. The Federal W-2 SSA copy cannot be printed on perforated paper.
      Note: The Federal W2 Copy A and W3 forms that print within the Federal eFiling & Reporting (Aatrix) program have been certified for submission on plain paper by the IRS. The boxes are not required to be printed in red ink on computer-generated forms. You can identify the approved form by looking for the numbers 0000/1048 under the year on the W2 form and in the Employers email address box on the W3 form.
    • Federal W3: Print to Plain Paper (see above disclaimers)
    • State – Copy 1 (prints 4 employees per sheet): The system will prompt you to print to Blank 4-part perforated forms, but Sage recommends you contact the State agency for their specific W2 printing/perforation requirements. The applicable Sage form is LW2BLNK4NB (http://tinyurl.com/zpq3pzk).
    • Employer W2 (Copy D): This form can be printed to plain paper or to a Blank 4-part perforated form. This form prints 4 employees per sheet.
  • Form 1095
    • Employee 1095-B: Blank Full page w/instructions on back. If ordering from Sage, this is form L1095BBLK (http://tinyurl.com/h4oyhy7).
    • Employee 1095-C: Blank Full page w/instructions on back. This is Sage Form L1095CBLK (http://tinyurl.com/zpdgwhe).
    • Forms 1094 and 1095 Federal & Employer copies can be printed to plain paper.
      Note: When using eFiling and Reporting to print ACA 1095 forms, Aatrix has designed their form templates on both of the 1095 forms to print the employee’s address in alignment with the existing W-2 envelope, which will help reduce costs.
  • Forms 1099/1096
    • Recipient 1099 (Federal, 2-Copy 2s and Copy B): Blank 4-part perforated form. If ordering from Sage, this is form L99BLANK4 (http://tinyurl.com/zdvsv3b) or L99BK4DWS (bundle with self-seal envelopes) (http://tinyurl.com/z5hbqwq).
      Note: The recipient notice is not printed on the backs of these blank forms; you will need to print the recipient instructions to plain paper from within the 1099 eFiling viewer screen.
    • Federal 1099 (Copy A): Copy A must be printed on official pre-printed federal forms RED ink.
    • Federal 1096 Form: 1096 Form must be printed on official pre-printed federal forms RED ink.
      Note: For the Federal 1099 Copy A and 1096 forms, please contact Sage Forms for specific part # applicable to the type of 1099 forms you will be printing (MISC, DIV, or INT).
    • Payer 1099 (Copy C): This form prints 4 recipients per sheet and can be printed to Plain Paper or Blank 4-part perforated forms.
    • State 1099: This form prints 4 recipients per sheet and can be printed to Blank 4-part perforated forms. Sage recommends that you contact the State agency to confirm specific 1099 printing/perforation requirements. Some states do not require 1099s to be filed.
    • State 1096: Print to Plain Paper, but please contact the State agency for their specific 1096 printing/perforation requirements. Some states do not require 1096 form.

All of these tax forms can be ordered from Sage Checks & Forms (http://www.sagechecks.com/estore/Tax+Forms/catalog410007_ctlg.ct?networkId=Sage). Sage Forms Division provides approved IRS forms and they are the only forms guaranteed by Sage to be 100% compatible with Sage 100 integration with eFiling and Reporting.

If you have any questions, or need assistance processing your year-end tax forms, please reach out to your Sage 100 Business Partner. In Jacksonville and Northeast Florida, you may contact Chris Mulhern or Ed Wlodarczyk at Ennis, Pellum & Associates: 904-396-5965.

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Tips to Avoid Malware Infection

Your day starts normally enough. You log onto your work computer, check e-mail, laugh at the cute kitten or puppy video on Facebook, and open your Sage 100 accounting software to begin your day’s tasks. That’s when you notice that the Sage 100 menu is blank – no modules, tasks, favorites are listed. Zippo! Nada!

So what happened?

We’ve seen at least four instances since December 2015 where one of our clients has been infected with malware known as a Cryptolocker bug, or Ransomware. This is a type of infection that targets documents such as Microsoft Office extensions (.doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx), Adobe PDF (.pdf) documents, and photos (.jpg, .jpeg), and scrambles the contents via an encryption key. It is known as Ransomware because the user will receive a message that the contents of the computer have been encrypted, and can be saved by paying a specified amount. Unfortunately, we’ve discovered that the malware also affects Sage data files, resulting in the blank menu and the inability to open tasks.

How do you know you’re infected? Well, the blank Sage 100 menu is a clue. The real evidence appears when you actually try to open an infected document, when you’ll receive a warning that looks something like this:

bitcryptor_pic2

This type of malware is extremely hard to contain, and almost impossible to recover from unless you have a good daily backup procedure in place. The best possible solution is to prevent the malware from infecting you in the first place. While no single method is ever 100% fool-proof, there are some cybersecurity techniques that, if put into practice, will shield you from most malware infections that are shared via the internet.

Most malware today is delivered via what is termed an ‘exploit kit’ – a sneaky little applet that rummages around your computer seeking out weaknesses in the system: an unprotected OS, software that hasn’t been updated, or a browser with insufficient security protocols (can you spell ‘IE’?). Here are some ways (courtesy of our friends at Malwarebytes Labs) to protect against exploits:

  1. Update your Operating System, Browsers, and Plugins. In the past, we used to wait before installing Windows updates – just to see if other applications were affected by the update. These days, with security vulnerabilities being discovered on what seems like a weekly basis, it makes sense to install operating system and software updates as soon as possible. Updates to operating systems, browsers, and plugins are often released to patch recently discovered vulnerabilities; failure to patch those ‘holes’ allows hackers and other cyberbullies to find their way in through those vulnerabilities.
  2. Enable click-to-play plugins. Exploit kits may also be delivered via malicious ads. You don’t even need to click on the ad to become infected, and these malicious ads may be found on well-known web sites. Along with keeping your computer and browsers up to date, you can help to block these exploit kits by enabling click-to-plan plugins.Click-to-play plugins keep Flash or Java from running unless you specifically tell them to (by clicking on the ad). The bulk of malvertising relies on exploiting these plugins, so enabling this feature in your browser settings will help keep the bad guys at bay. This article explains how to enable click-to-play in most browsers.
  3. Remove any software you are not using (especially legacy programs). Any program you are not using is probably not being updated regularly, if at all. This includes old versions of Adobe Reader and even your operating (Windows XP, anyone?). If you are not using it, uninstall it. If you paid for it, update it!

Another method for malware infection is known as social engineering, which may take the shape of an e-mail from a trusted source (your bank, your credit card company, the IRS), a tech support scam, or a fishy social media campaign. For instance, I recently accepted a friend request on Facebook from an old neighbor, only to be inundated with messages regarding some political organization with links to “more information”. Make yourself aware of the following tactics to help you avoid uninvited malware:

  1. Don’t trust every e-mail you receive – even if from a known name. The e-mail you just received from your college roommate or your co-worker may not be all it seems. Check the sender’s e-mail address: is it from the actual company or domain listed? Hover over the links provided in the body of the e-mail: is the URL legit? Read the e-mail carefully – are there weird line breaks or poor grammar? In short, don’t ever click on a link unless you are 100% positive that it is from a safe source.
  2. Do not call fake tech support numbers. Has this happened to you? You’re happily browsing along, enjoying the latest puppy video on FB, when a popup window appears claiming that your computer has been infected, and offering to scan your computer and fix the infection. DO NOT CLICK A LINK OR CALL THE NUMBER!!! A legitimate security company does not market via a pop-up message, and would not scan your computer unless you asked them to.
    warning-your-computer-may-be-infected-virusOne of two things might happen here:

    1. You click on the link to have your computer scanned. The result is that you have allowed a cybercriminal to scan your computer for vulnerabilities that will allow them to actually infect your computer.
    2. You call the 1-800 number listed, and you pay a small charge for the company to scan and clean your computer. See above (A.) for the results.
  3. Do not believe cold calls regarding your computer. This is happening right now in my house. My wife informs me that we have received no less than two dozen phone calls over a four-week period from someone regarding our Microsoft Windows system. They want her to connect with them to allow them to check her computer. We are also receiving calls from the IRS, who tell us (in broken English, by the way) that the IRS is suing us and we must call an 1-800 number to avoid jail time.Don’t confirm or update any info provided by these callers. Chances are that they have purchased information hacked from a database that contained some of your information, or it is just what it seems – a cold call. Ask questions: Where is the person calling from – and can you call them back? If you are worried about whether the call might be legit, hang up and contact your bank, credit card company, etc. directly to be sure there isn’t a problem.

Finally, always protect yourself when browsing online. By following some basic tips and maintaining good habits while online, you can evade infection from most methods of malware attack. Here are some of the basics:

  1. Use strong passwords and/or password managers. A strong password is long, is not written down anywhere, and isn’t easily tied to personal information (birthdate, pet’s name). It should contain letters, numbers, and special characters. You should also not repeat the same password for different logins. How can you be expected to remember thousands of different passwords? I use a password manager called Roboform. Not only does Roboform Everywhere allow me to have access to all of my logins and passwords on multiple computers, but all are encrypted and visible only to me. The program will even assign strong passwords if requested, so that you don’t have to tax your brain trying to think up a clever password. The passwords are strong and random. Try it – I think you’ll like it.
  2. Make sure you are using a secure connection. If you are at the airport and using free wifi, chances are that you are not secure. Free wifi, available in airports, stores, restaurants, etc., is great for customers who may want to comparison shop or just review their social media. However, you do not want to make any purchases or fill out any forms when on an unsecure connection; you are basically allowing anyone else on the network to view your personal information. If you see a padlock icon to the left of the URL, then you are on a secure site; otherwise, keep your information safe by not revealing it to the world.
  3. Log out of websites when you are finished. Don’t just close the browser after logging into your bank, healthcare provider, etc. You may be leaving yourself vulnerable if you don’t log out, especially if using a public wifi provider.

There are many other ways to protect yourself from malware infection. I use a program called Malwarebytes on my personal computers as well as a strong anti-virus program (Eset). I allow each of these programs to auto-update whenever a new signature is released. Even then, there is still the possibility of an attack from a new strain not yet known to the protection providers. By following the steps outlined above, I am less likely to allow malware to infect my computers.

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Slow Performance using Sage 100?

We receive occasional questions regarding performance with Sage 100 – task windows opening slowly, posting delays, and the like. In some cases, a simple computer reboot can resolve the problem – especially if the performance issues have recently appeared and no other changes have been made on the network or computer. However, in situations where the performance issue persists or is network-wide, your anti-virus solution may be the culprit.

Slow performance in Sage 100 tasks can sometimes be caused by Anti-virus software targeting or interfering with the functionality of Sage 100 program, system, or data files. It is easy to determine whether your anti-virus program is directly affecting Sage 100 performance: simply temporarily disable the anti-virus product to determine whether performance improves. Consider speed, file locking problems, and any other error messages that have been encountered during testing.

If you have determined that your anti-virus product is affecting Sage 100 performance, consider the following possible resolutions:

  • Disable any aggressive or continuous (also known as On-Access, Constant, Real-time, or Network Scanning) monitoring or scanning of these Sage 100 programs:
    • “..\MAS90\Pvxwin32.exe”
    • “..\MAS90\Launch32.exe”
  • Avoid running scans during the work day. We’ve seen several instances where Sage 100 users were unable to use the program due to a scheduled anti-virus scan beginning during the work day.
  • Exclude the “..\MAS90” directory and sub-directories and contents on the server where Sage 100 is installed. Do the same on the workstations if using Sage 100 Advanced or Premium editions.
  • If unwilling to exclude the entire “..\MAS90” directory, consider excluding the following file extensions on both the server and workstations:
    • DCL, DD, DDE, DDF, LIB, M4D, M4L, M4P, M4T, PRM, PVC, PVX, RPT, SOA, XEQ

In most cases that Sage 100 users have experienced slow performance, we have found that the above changes resolved those issues.

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Sage 100 Compatibility with Windows 10

It’s finally happening: your computer has died, and the only available options to replace it come only with the Windows 10 Operating System. If you’re using Sage 100, and you recently updated your hardware to Windows 10, you may have discovered that you cannot print to the Sage Paperless Converter any more. If you have experienced this issue, the answer is quite simple: your version of Sage 100 is not compatible with Windows 10.

The Microsoft Windows 10 operating system (Professional and Enterprise editions, 32-bit and 64-bit) is only supported with Sage 100 versions 2016 and 2015 (with Service Update 4). If you are on a version below these, then you need to upgrade to a compatible version if you switch to Windows 10 OS on any of your business computers.

 

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Sage 100c Manufacturing Guide Released

Sage have just released an 8 paged brochure describing the capabilities of the new Sage 100c Manufacturing Add-on- an enhanced manufacturing package incorporating the functionality of Job Ops into Sage 100c.

Sage 100c Manufacturing is available only for the subscription-based Sage 100c and requires the Purchase Order, Sales Order and Inventory Control modules. It is only available as an add-on to Sage 100c Advanced and Complete bundles, at any business care level, and on either the Providex or SQL platform.

The brochure is available at the following link:https://www.sage.com/na/~/media/site/erp/responsive/resources/Sage_ERP_100c_Manufacturing_brochure.pdf .

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Sage 100 – End-of-year updates available now

As of December 23, Sage has released the 2015 end-of-year Interim Release Download (IRD) and 2016 Q1 payroll tax table updates (TTU). The Aatrix year-end update is also available; when you first access either Payroll Federal E-Filing and Reporting or Accounts Payable Form 1099 eFiling and Reporting, you will be prompted to update your forms.

The following are the required minimum Sage 100 versions. If you are not at least on one of the minimum versions below, you must add the required product update (PU) to get to the minimum before installing the 2015 IRD.
• 2013 PU 9
• 2014 PU 7
• 2015 PU 3

The 2015 IRD contains the following enhancements for Accounts Payable:
IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION: 1099 Form changes were required for the tax year 2015 and have been incorporated in this update. Maintenance, data entry, as well as certain reports and Form 1099 eFiling and Reporting have been modified to adhere to the 2015 1099 Miscellaneous, Dividend, and Interest forms as published by the IRS for the tax year 2015 filings.

Once the 2015 IRD is installed, the new 2015 boxes will be available for all companies in the installation. The following changes have been made to accommodate the correct placement of the following information:

1099-INT:

  • Box 12 is now blank
  • Box 13 is now Bond premium on tax exempt bond
  • Box 14 is now Tax-exempt and tax credit bond CUSIP no.
  • Box 15 is now State
  • Box 16 is State Identification No.
  • Box 17 is State Tax Withheld

No form changes were required for the 1099-MISC and 1099-DIV forms.

 

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Sage releases product updates for ACA filing

The following Sage 100 product updates are now available:
– Sage 100 2015 Product Update 3
– Sage 100 2014 Product Update 7
– Sage 100 2013 Product Update 9
– Sage 100 4.50 Product Update 8

The 2015 and 2014 updates include new fields in ACA Employer Maintenance and the ability to process and e-file 1094/1095 B and 1094/1095 C forms.

The 2013 and 4.50 updates include new payroll tasks to help with Affordable Care Act reporting, which includes the ability to process and e-file 1094/1095 C forms.

If you need to file the “B” forms, and you are not on version 2014 or above, you will need to upgrade in order to process the forms.

The picture below, while a bit blurry, offers a graphical representation of whether you need to file and which forms are applicable.

ACA Graphic

For more information on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Tax Provisions, go to the IRS website (http://www.irs.gov/Affordable-Care-Act) or the ACA Center on Sage City (http://Sagecity.na.sage.com/p/aca).

Contact your Sage Business Partner regarding installing your product updates or upgrading your Sage 100 system.

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